Your “song” reaches others.

This weeks post is going to be kind of a sequel to last weeks post “What keeps you going?”. I didn’t intend to make this a sequel, it just happened.

I received this email soon after a concert that I did and it always amazes me how little old me could touch someone else that I’ve never met through my music and story. I posted the email below so that you can read what was sent.

In my workshops I often talk with my fellow musicians about the song that’s inside every one of you. When I tell you that I want to hear you play, it’s because I really do. I love to listen not just to your expertise with your instrument but I love most of all to hear your story come out in song. Now this does not mean that you have to play an original piece, this can be just your interpretation of a song that someone asked you to learn to play. Or a favorite song for your grandmother who is now gone. Once you internalize a piece and make it your own, it becomes something wholly different. It becomes it’s own instrument to touch others and affect them deeply.

Don’t forget that when you play for others, you’re telling them a story. Play your song. Play the song and sing with your hands and your heart. Enjoy, smile, listen and then release the notes into the world for them to hear. Whether it’s a full concert hall or just your family at the Christmas table.

I will always be amazed that something so simple as music can reach so deep. Sometimes I can take that for granted because I work hard at what I do and I enjoy it so much, as I’m sure you do. I don’t want to waste my talent and I’m accountable to God for what I do with it here on earth. And yes, it is the most wonderful feeling in the world to see someone smile or tear up and say, “Thank you, that was amazing!”.

Here’s the email that I received.

Hi Ted,

“I was one of the people in the audience when you performed at the Pixy. I dragged my husband, kicking and screaming in protest–not really, but almost!– to the concert (he had never heard of a hammered dulcimer), but by the time you finished playing, he went out to the lobby and bought all three of your CDs. My dad also accompanied us, and he enjoyed himself as well. My mother passed away recently, and my dad hasn’t gotten out too much since then, so it was a joy and a blessing that he was able to come to your concert and have a good time and hear your wonderful music.

Good luck with your new CD, and God bless you and your family.”

Play on my friends and never forget that we pass on a story and part of eternity…

Ted


2 comments

  • Dan Griffin

    Dan Griffin

    I have learned that you never know how much you have influenced someone else until it's too late. I learned this a long time ago, when I was 20, and frankly I was amazed and astounded. In fact, you might never know how much you influence someone else. That's a lot of pressure! :)

    I have learned that you never know how much you have influenced someone else until it's too late. I learned this a long time ago, when I was 20, and frankly I was amazed and astounded. In fact, you might never know how much you influence someone else.

    That's a lot of pressure! smile

  • JustJat

    JustJat

    Playing in worship in church shows me time and time again how much God can move through music - it is a great responsibility to approach playing with a right attitude, and a great privilege to be used in that way.

    Playing in worship in church shows me time and time again how much God can move through music - it is a great responsibility to approach playing with a right attitude, and a great privilege to be used in that way.

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